News

Highlights of the Fistula Campaign 2008

16 June 2009
Author: UNFPA

The devastation of obstetric fistula affects some 2 million women across the developing world, with approximately 50,000 to 100,000 new cases occurring every year.

UNFPA’s Campaign to End Fistula aims to eliminate this condition. Progress to date is summarized in a two-page preview of its upcoming annual report, “Healing Wounds, Repairing Lives”, which will be released later this summer.

As it describes, achievements since the Campaign’s inception in 2003 include:

  • More than 12,000 women have received fistula treatment and care with support from UNFPA.
  • More than 25 countries have integrated fistula into relevant national policies and plans.
  • At least 38 countries have completed a situation analysis of fistula prevention and treatment.

Achievements in 2008:

  • United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon presented the first-ever report about fistula to Member States in October. The report outlines efforts to end obstetric fistula and help achieve Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health.
  • The campaign was recognized as a model for championing collaboration between countries in the Global South, receiving an award of excellence from the United Nations Development Programme.

The upcoming annual report will provide more details about the growing momentum around this issue and share individual stories of hope and transformation

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