Resources on Gender-based violence

In Niger, which has one of the highest child marriage rates in the world, these 16 extraordinary girls refused to become child brides.

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The large majority of registered internally displaced people are women and children who have been forced from their homes and communities with very few resources or strategies for coping with the economic hardships and growing stress they face. Among them are pregnant women who travel across the contact line to deliver their children in maternity centres and hospitals in the government-controlled areas.

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This poster lays out the basics of the Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to Gender-based Violence in Emergencies

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This brochure offers a glimpse into the Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to Gender-based Violence in Emergencies.

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These frequently asked questions explain the purpose and use of the Minimum Standards for Prevention & Response to Gender Based Violence in Emergencies. For more information, go here. 

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This Orientation packet explains the Minimum Standards for Prevention & Response to Gender Based Violence in Emergencies.

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In the last couple of months, humanitarian actors have not been able to deliver reproductive health supplies or assess the quality, availability, accessibility and acceptability of the existing gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in non-government-controlled areas.

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This pictorial book documents the impact of the years of violence on Syrian women, girls, men and boys.

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The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts.

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Gender-based violence is a complicated and sensitive subject. Reporting on gender-based violence means discussing issues that are often considered ‘taboo,’ and talking publicly about intimate and distressing matters. This can be particularly challenging in countries where tradition and religion play an important role in everyday life.

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