Resources on Gender-based violence

This brochure offers a glimpse into the Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to Gender-based Violence in Emergencies.

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These frequently asked questions explain the purpose and use of the Minimum Standards for Prevention & Response to Gender Based Violence in Emergencies. For more information, go here. 

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This Orientation packet explains the Minimum Standards for Prevention & Response to Gender Based Violence in Emergencies.

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In the last couple of months, humanitarian actors have not been able to deliver reproductive health supplies or assess the quality, availability, accessibility and acceptability of the existing gender-based violence (GBV) and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in non-government-controlled areas.

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This pictorial book documents the impact of the years of violence on Syrian women, girls, men and boys.

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The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts.

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Gender-based violence is a complicated and sensitive subject. Reporting on gender-based violence means discussing issues that are often considered ‘taboo,’ and talking publicly about intimate and distressing matters. This can be particularly challenging in countries where tradition and religion play an important role in everyday life.

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GBV is a complicated and sensitive subject involving the use of terms such as ‘rape‘, ’sexual abuse’, ‘child marriage,’ ‘domestic violence’ and ‘harassment,’ to name a few. All of these terms immediately provoke strong feelings. Reporting on GBV means discussing issues that are often considered ‘taboo,’ and talking publicly about intimate and distressing matters. This can be particularly challenging in countries where tradition and religion play an important role in everyday life. There is often a difference between the way traditional practices are viewed by ‘the international community’ and by communities themselves; this can cause conflict.

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In a seminal article in 1990, Amartya Sen suggested that worldwide, particularly in Asia, millions of women were missing from the population totals of many countries. He also noted the alarming fact that the sex ratio for female children in China, India and the Republic of Korea is actually deteriorating while the overall sex ratio for females in those countries has marginally improved.

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Sexual violence is common in humanitarian settings. It may become more acute in the wake of a natural disaster, and it occurs at every stage of a conflict. The victims are usually women and adolescents, whose vulnerability is exacerbated in the chaos of a crisis. Being separated from one’s family and community, or undertaking certain roles, such as foraging for food or firewood, can put them at even greater risk of exploitation and abuse.

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