Ending Child Marriage: A Guide for Global Policy Action

No. of pages: 36

Publication Date: 2006

Author: UNFPA, IPPF

Tackling child marriage is a daunting but possible task, requiring political will and proactive multi-faceted strategies at the international, national and community levels. Ending Child Marriage: A Guide for Global Policy Action is part of a wider advocacy strategy to raise awareness on child marriage and its effects on communities. It is also part of the wider initiative on preventing HIV infection, particularly among adolescent girls, which is led by the United Nations Global Coalition on Women and AIDS, with the support of UNFPA, IPPF and Young Positives.

Tackling child marriage aims to stimulate decision-makers worldwide, in particular government policy-makers, donors, and international development agencies, to take all necessary measures to end this violation of rights. The publication outlines this global problem and the reasons why child marriage persists, assesses how it contravenes many international human rights standards, and then provides policy and programmatic recommendations. It will assist organizations to accelerate action and advocate for an end to this practice.

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