Comprehensive Condom Programming

A guide for resource mobilization and country programming

No. of pages: 16

Publication Date: 2011

Author: UNFPA

Publisher: UNFPA

ISBN: 978-0-89714-928-0

This guide outlines a 10-Step Strategic Approach to scale up comprehensive condom programming (CCP) that encourages the participation of donors and international agencies while placing ultimate responsibility for decision-making and implementation in the hands of national partners. This 10-step approach is being implemented in selected countries in most regions. The design of a condom programme may vary from country to country, but the process of designing and implementing a SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-governed) strategy has many common features, which are described in this document.

Male and female condoms are key in protecting against sexually transmitted infections (STI), including HIV. Guided by international development principles, UNFPA pledges to ensure that all condom programming efforts are nationally owned and country-led. Also, UNFPA assists national HIV-prevention programmes to develop condom programming strategies through which every sexually active person at risk of HIV/STIs - regardless of age, culture, economic situation, gender, marital status, religion or sexual orientation - has access to good quality condoms when and where s/he needs them.

 

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