H.R.H. The Crown Princess of Sweden Discusses Maternal Health, Gender Equality and Youth During Visit to UNFPA HQ

10 October 2013
Author: UNFPA
H.R.H. The Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden in conversation with UNFPA Deputy Executive Director (Programme) Kate Gilmore. Photo UNFPA

NEW YORK — H.R.H. The Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden visited the UNFPA Headquarters in early October, where she received a comprehensive briefing on key areas of UNFPA's mandate.

UNFPA Deputy Executive Director (Programme) Kate Gilmore welcomed H.R.H. The Crown Princess and emphasized the importance of UNFPA's relationship with Sweden, which is strongly committed to maternal health and the well-being of youth and adolescents.

The Crown Princess underlined her keen interest in UNFPA's work, particularly in the areas of maternal health and midwifery, gender-based violence and support in humanitarian settings, including the Fund's work in Syria and the Sahel.

"UNFPA's work in support of women and children is essential and I am delighted to have the opportunity to learn more about UNFPA's activities and programmes," said the Crown Princess, adding that Sweden has been a long-standing champion of maternal health and gender equality.

The meeting also included a discussion of the post-2015 development process and the centrality of sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights in the future development goals.

"In a world with the largest youth generation ever, access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights remain a key to sustainable development," said Ms. Gilmore.

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