UNFPAState of World Population 2004
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HOME: STATE OF WORLD POPULATION 2004: Reproductive Health for Communities in Crisis
State of World Population
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Reproductive Health for Communities in Crisis
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Reproductive Health for Communities in Crisis

Safe Motherhood
Family Planning
Sexual and Gender-based Violence
HIV/AIDS and Other STIs
Adolescent Reproductive Health
Gains and Gaps

Gains and Gaps

While international funding for reproductive health needs in emergencies has increased since 1994, the number of people requiring these services has grown faster than related assistance. More than half the countries in sub-Saharan Africa have been affected by crisis over the past decade—whether directly, as in Rwanda or Liberia, or indirectly, as in the United Republic of Tanzania and Guinea, which have been burdened by large numbers of refugees from neighbouring countries.

Failure to provide for the reproductive health needs of populations affected by crisis, especially in the age of AIDS, can have tragic consequences not only for individual women, men and children. It can also undermine an entire nation’s stability and prospects for post-conflict reconciliation, reconstruction and development.

A new global evaluation by the Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Refugee Settings warns that recent progress in this area is now threatened by stagnant or declining donor funding, compounded by the United States administration’s political opposition to some aspects of reproductive health. Increased advocacy and funding are more critical than ever before, as geopolitical instability and increasing vulnerability to natural disasters threaten to increase the number of people in need in coming years.

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