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HOME: POPULATION ISSUES: PREVENTING HIV INFECTION: UNFPA Response 2003
Preventing HIV Infection
UNFPA Response 2003
Strategy for Prevention
Country Commitments
Regional Response
Global Action
Conclusion: Challenges
Statements Guiding UNFPA in HIV Prevention

Country Commitments

More than 140 countries
Threat to development
Building on lessons learned
Country situations
Emergency and conflict situations

"The good news is that even the most severe HIV epidemic can be turned back, when HIV prevention and care are tackled seriously through community-wide efforts with the full support of governments, community organizations, religious institutions, and business. In every continent across the world, from cities and rural areas, we have examples of safe behaviours resulting in markedly lower HIV rates. The extension of access to care is slowly gaining momentum, and brings hope to millions."

— Dr. Peter Piot, UNAIDS Executive Director

More than 140 countries

Photo credit: JOHNETTE IRIS STUBBS

 

Young students from Thailand listen intently as teenage volunteers speak about reproductive health and HIV/AIDS prevention. The programme is supported by UNFPA and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.

UNFPA works in more than 140 countries, at their request, assisting governments with the creation of population strategies and policies. Most UNFPA activities are at the country level. HIV prevention efforts are often integrated within ongoing programmes in reproductive health, including ones focusing on family planning and sexual health. They are also part of the provision of male and female condoms and a wide variety of information, education and communication activities.

The epidemic differs dramatically from country to country, which is why UNFPA supports the analysis of demographic, social, economic, cultural, behavioural and epidemiological factors. Within countries, one community may be greatly affected while others remain relatively free of the virus, for the time being.

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