Cote d'Ivoire Humanitarian Emergency

Girls sit outside their school.
UNFPA Cote d'Ivoire

Cote d'Ivoire is recovering from a civil war and post-election violence that occurred in the first decade of the 2000s. In 2015 the country saw a fair and peaceful election take place; however, it still faces some challenges in peacebuilding, national reconciliation, emergency preparedness for natural disasters and combating the high level of poverty. With a third of the population between the ages of 10 and 24, it is especially critical that women of reproductive age and young people have access to information and health services that can give them an active say in their futures. UNFPA in Cote d'Ivoire supports measures to identify development needs and has helped enact population and gender equality policies. It also works to provide sexual and reproductive health services and supports mechanisms to prevent and respond to gender-based violence.

Country Population: 22.7 mil
Level of Crisis:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Humanitarian needs

65,000
16,250
2,600
20,000
Last updated on - 01 January 2017
UNFPA WCARO

Humanitarian funding

Resources in $

Key results2016

  • Services delivered
    Total people reached with sexual and reproductive health and gender-based violence services in humanitarian settings
    700,000
    Number of mobile clinics
    1
    Number of facilities supported that provide emergency obstetric care
    2
    Number of service delivery points supported that provide clinical management of rape
    6
  • Capacity building
    Youth facilitators and volunteers trained on sexual and reproductive health
    15
    Health personnel trained on Reproductive Health Kits
    54
    Health personnel trained on gender-based violence case management
    54
Disclaimer
  • Results data are reported and updated as they become available.
  • - Targets and UNFPA's populations of concern, including women of reproductive age and pregnant women, are estimated using the MISP calculator.
  • - Funding estimates are based on country planning processes, including inter-agency humanitarian response plans and regional refugee and resilience plans.
  • L1: Humanitarian crises in which the national and international resources available in the affected country are sufficient for the required response.
  • L2: Humanitarian crises requiring significant support from neighbouring countries, regional organizations and possibly humanitarian agency headquarters.
  • L3: Major, sudden-onset humanitarian crises requiring mobilization across the humanitarian system.
  • Crisis levels are determined by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee, a forum of UN and non-UN humanitarian partners.